Learn NLP - Auditory Constructed - Therapeutic NLP

 
 
 
 
 
 
icon icon icon icon icon icon icon icon icon icon icon icon icon icon icon icon icon icon icon icon icon icon
{
Previous
Lesson
Next
Lesson
}
Auditory Constructed
 
Auditory Constructed
 
Auditory Constructed
 
Auditory Constructed
 

Auditory Constructed

If a person looks out to the horizon and to their right they are looking in an area that will stimulate their brain to access Auditory Constructed (but this is an example of a Tonal position in comparison to a Digital position) or sound information related to sounds they may be constructing or creating. Eye accessing in this area could also signal painful sounds/voice memories from the person’s past. When people dominantly look to the left, others suspect (due to mis information) that they might be lying. This is usually the reason for sunglasses in poker games. If a person is dominantly auditory in their internal processing others may think they are shifty-eyed or untrustworthy but it actually means they are hard at work listening to you intently. They key to determining this is finding the eyes at the horizon or ear level and then being able to distinguish if the person is looking to the right of the midline of their face.

Try this: Combine the sound of a fog horn turning into a wind chime. Most likely the sound will have you look towards your right ear.

It is thought that 15% of people in North America are dominantly auditory in the way that they learn and process information. This doesn't mean they aren't capable of using their other senses. They just have a preference. And, even though they dominantly use visual ways of processing it doesn't mean that they don't go through other senses to complete their information processing. Generally, we use many more of our senses to process information. So 15% of North Americans (maybe) mostly start auditory and then use some other sense and and then another sense and on and on - This accounts for our very different and unique learning and information processing styles and explains why so many people these days are diagnosed with learning disabilities who aren't really learning disabled.